Tag Archives: SMM

Social Survival on the Internet Highway!

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The internet reminds me of some of those freaky-looking dudes in the Mad Max movies who tried to kill, steal, and plunder gasoline from anyone and everyone who crossed their paths.  And, like Mad Max, we have to survive the day for a hopefully even better sequel!  All of this has to be done on a slightly different interstate:  the Internet Highway!  But instead of using guns, crossbows, spears, and all sorts of other weaponry, we have to use our personality and various social sites and various social tools along this mysterious and adventurous stretch of treacherous roadway.

My goal as a writer is to develop a social following on the internet more so than to write any certain number of books by any given certain date.  This may sound a bit off the mark, but there is a method to the madness.  

I’ve learned, after self-publishing a book, that it is not enough for an independent author to (hopelessly!) market the hell out of his book.  The author has to do everything in his power to establish a loyal following.  And for this, I am truly thankful for the opportunity to have the ear of everyone who has subscribed to me and my activities (and sometimes lack of).  

You may be asking:  “Why is this more important to you than getting a substantial amount of writing on the market?”  Saturating the market with everything Phil Sanderson is definitely important to me.  But at the same time, finding the means to accomplish it more effectively is of higher priority.  One reason is that there is no point in coming up with a large quantity of material when there is not that many people interested in doing anything with it.  Secondly, one of the main things agents look for, when trying to find a good author worth her salt to represent, is just that:  a huge following!  

Yet I am really quite surprised with how everything has turned out.  I’ve been established on Facebook now for more than five years and only just recently started getting really involved with Twitter.  But strangely enough, my success with the little tweety bird is phenomenally greater than it is with with the big-blue “F”.  I plan to break 1,000 followers next week on Twitter.  But I don’t even have anywhere near 100 likes on my personal Facebook page.  

I am also quite pleased with my success here on WordPress.  If you are receiving this article, then I largely have you to thank for this success.   I am really starting to develop quite the following on Goodreads as well.  And I’m not entirely sure why.  Maybe it is because I run my WordPress blog through Goodreads.  So, thank you all so very much.  On the other hand, I am also encountering slow starts with Google+ and Pinterest.  And I only barely exist on Authors Den.  

But I have a pretty cool strategy that I believe may help me out.  Since I’m encountering leaps and bounds on Twitter, I plan to market all my other social sites through that medium.  It’s not rocket science, just good, commonsense advertising.  And I am hoping that this article will help give you guys some ideas as to how you may be able to boost your own social campaigns (in the even that you have need to do so).  

So please remember to take a lesson from Mad Max when it comes to successfully reaching your various social media marketing destinations:  As your trucking along in your day-to-day tasks — be it creating art or music, or writing books — the most important thing to remember along the journey is to not run out of gas.  And we do this by making sure that we have an active, captivated audience who actually gives a damn about what we are doing.

Until my next article, be blessed!

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Phil Sanderson’s Social Media Marketing Report — 2/23/14

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Yay!  I’ve reached and surpassed a good milestone on Twitter:  500 Follows!  All the other Social Media is lacking quite a bit, however.  I am on my way to reaching 50 likes on my Facebook page. As for my WordPress blog — by the grace of God — I have somehow acquired 16 followers, which is far better than I ever got elsewhere on other blog hosting sites.  As far as slower growth media, I’m finally  starting to get more friends on Goodreads.  But I’m still a total greenhorn on Google+ and various others on which I’m established.  I’ve yet to research more on all these other different ones.  I’m also examining some small-dollar investment opportunities to invest in paid advertising on Twitter and Facebook.

So all in all, thanks to all of you who have found an interest in me and continue to stay actively involved in my media.  You have been a true blessing from God to me.  For those of you who haven’t, if you are reading this and have a chance to support me on my various social media, I hope you will someday soon find some time to do so:

Phil Sanderson Author on Google+

Phil Sanderson’s Facebook Page

2018: An Uncivil War — Facebook Group

Phil Sanderson on Twitter

Phil Sanderson on Pinterest

Phil Sanderson on YouTube

Phil Sanderson on Goodreads

Phil Sanderson on AuthorsDen

The Busy-ness of Writing!

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Since I was a teenager, I’ve always DREAMED of being a writer.  Little did I know just how much work was involved.  I thought to myself, after becoming a journalist:  “Certainly being a book writer can’t be much busier than this.”  Man, was I wrong!

Shortly after I got out of the Marines, I researched what it took to become an author of fiction books.  I found out that it involved sending hundreds, if not thousands, of query letters to publishers and agents in order to either secure a book deal, or at least representation for such.  But those were the old days.  

Then came the dawn of self-publishing!  

I suddenly realized it was a brave new world for anyone who wanted to make their dream come true.  Unlike regular tradition, anyone who possessed enough money for the investment could pay to have their book made into reality.  There were no letters to send out.  No one you had to impress.  

The good thing about this was obvious.  Talented writers, who had previously not received a fair opportunity, and who had a great story to tell, could now get it out there and share it with the reading public.  Unfortunately, the downside of this was that some people who had no business writing a book would put — what many avid readers would consider — complete garbage on the market.  And then you had everything in between.  Thus, readers found themselves becoming much more selective and careful when making their purchases; and they found themselves publicly sharing their opinions (via the internet mostly) freely and liberally with any who would listen.

Just when it seemed that the writing revolution had played its last card, then came the ebook revolution.  Now anyone could suddenly write a book for free!  And the same thing as above happened once again, only this time in a new electronic format.

The main thing that all of these methods of publishing have in common is the writing itself.  And, if you do this correctly, this will keep you super busy in the very beginning.  Effective writers conduct research and schedule and keep interviews with key people who can give them helpful information for the books they write.  So here you have only three vastly time consuming duties in the single duty of writing.

As for the various ways of becoming published, there are advantages and disadvantages to each avenue.  I’ve never traditionally published myself, but I’ve heard that, the advantages in this classic way of publishing far outweigh the disadvantages.   For example, most traditional publishers will pay you up front to begin writing your book.  With the investment being made on the front end, the publishers make their money as your books begin and continue to sell on the market.  If they end up receiving a return on investment, then you can almost bet they will offer you another book deal.  If not, then there is always flipping burgers or dancing topless (or maybe both simultaneously…though I would not much recommend this!).  

As for the disadvantages of traditional publishing, many stories abound about how writers suggested a certain look to their cover and were totally blown off by the production team.  It is sad there is little creative control unless it is somehow written into the contract beforehand.  

As for self-publishing, it is about totally flipped upside down as compared to traditional publishing.  No one produces your book until you pay them.  Usually they will give you a lot of leeway in creativity.  Because of the usual steep investment required in self-publishing, most companies give you a lot of creative controls for your money.  

When it comes to ebook publishing, it is basically the best of both worlds, but without the final proud moment of holding a physical book in your hand.  You have complete creative control over everything.  And it costs basically nothing other than time (unless you pay someone to design your book cover) to produce your book and publish it to Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Smashwords, and various other publishers / booksellers out there.  

The biggest thing I have discovered about both self-publishing and ebook publishing is that in the end, writing the book seemed to be the easiest aspect of the process.  The hardest part, that which I never bargained for, lay in the marketing required for making any sort of profit.  I’m totally new to the process, but I am becoming very savvy very quickly as I post constant updates on Facebook, Twitter, and other various social media websites out there.  With traditional publishing, this is one headache that many writers are thankful to avoid.  And for this, I am very jealous of them.  

Many of you probably ask:  Was it all worth it in the end?  I cannot honestly answer this, because I haven’t yet reached the end…whatever the end happens to be.  Hell, maybe I end up doing an imitation of the King of Rock and Roll and end up dying on the toilet — not exactly the end I’m wanting, but okay.  Or maybe I become the next best thing to Tom Clancy.  Now, there we go!

What I can surely tell you is that quite a bit goes into writing a book, no matter how you do it…especially if you want to make any kind of money for doing so.